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Sun Gods In Exile
Black Light, White Lines

SS-094/2009

Adam Hitchcock: Vocals & Guitars
Tony D'Agostino: Guitars
JL: Bass
Johnny Kennedy: Drums

Additional Musicians:
Dave Unger:  Keys on Black Magic and Rise Up.
Benny Grotto:  Back up Vocals on Eye For an Eye and Rise Up.

Recorded @ Mad Oak Studios – Allston, MA.
Engineered, Produced and Coned by Benny Grotto & Scott Hamilton.
Mastered by Chris Goosman @ Baseline Audio - Ann Arbor, MI.

Reviews for Black Light, White Lines...

The Sleeping Shaman

Well God dam...put some Budweiser on ice, gun the throttle on the Mustang, wind down the windows and let's kick up some dust on Route 666!!! If Sun Gods in Exile haven't come up with the ultimate soundtrack to an irresponsibly fast ride down the open roads with the sun blazing and a hot blonde by your side then we may as well all travel by bus!!!

Guitarist Tony D'Agostino may have last served time in stoner groovers Cortez but in his current outfit he lets the sun beat down on his neck and the Marshall stacks run wild. This is hard assed, southern fired rock and roll at its best bringing to mind the furious chicken scratch guitar playing of Molly Hatchet and Blackfoot with the riffing majesty of AC/DC. This is as authentic as it gets.

From furious album opener "Eye for an Eye" with its refrain of "Downstairs I smell the cocaine" to the slow burn southern twin guitar freak out of album closer "495" this is a relentless ride to rock and roll Utopia. Hands up who wants a riff? Sun Gods have a truck load and once you're done with that they have a truck load more. You want choruses? Well let's look in the bag and we can pull out the aforementioned "Eye for an Eye", "Heaven Help Us All", "Mexico", "Rise Up"...Hell, this piece of plastic is wall to wall catchy hooks that you'll be singing for weeks. You want the best damn southern rock song that Skynyrd forgot to write? Well thankfully Sun Gods in Exile will throw "Hellwell" on the table with a gap toothed grin, a tip of the Stetson and a knowing wink. You want a singer who sounds like he's just had the time of his life in a cathouse with a bottle of hooch and a pound of weed? Adam's your man as his Bon Scott meets Danny Joe Brown wail cracks and growls all over these ten tunes. You want guitarists that are not afraid to wail and solo? Move over all you baggy trousered nu-metal chancers, don your flares and cowboy boots and let your fingers do the talkin' like it's 1975!!! Each song jumps to the twin Gibson attack...this is how Marshalls were meant to be used...loud and proud!!!

You would be forgiven for thinking that these guys had grown up around the swamps of Florida or kicking up dust in Texas but to find that they're actually from Portland, Maine...about as far north as you can get in the States before hitting Canada...makes this album even more of a surprise as this has redneck written right through it.

Small Stone Records has a rare knack of plunging its hand into the shit bucket of modern music and pulling out more nuggets of gold than a mid west prospector and in Sun Gods in Exile their reputation will stay intact for a long time to come. Summer's coming, the open road is calling and my car stereo is crying out for more.

- Ollie


May 15th, 2010
www.thesleepingshaman.com/

Broken Beard

Christ, the last feral sound I heard coming out of Boston was probably Cocked N’ Loaded and that seems to me to be some time ago. Ok, so Sun Gods in Exile are technically from Portland, Maine, but they’ve got Boston ties (guitarist Anthony D’Agostino was in Cortez) and that good ol’ Americana rawk vibe that so many bands in Beantown had a monopoly on just a few years ago. Bands like Roadsaw, Cracktorch, Crash and Burn, and Quitter immediately come to mind, which is some goddamn ELITE company, mister. So point a finger anywhere you want at the map because this bitchin’ action will work just about anywhere.

Now, you might think Black Light, White Lines is payin’ some sort of homage to the best party you’ve ever been to, and perhaps it is, but it’s also a white knuckle anthem for anyone who has ever driven their Camaro to hell and back with a bucket of fried chicken in their lap, a naked broad in the backseat, and a trunk full of illegal booze and gasoline. Some of the album is spastic arena glory and some of it is flaming southern mischief, but in the end it’s all turbo-sized FUN. And we can always use some of that, no matter where we’re from.

- Jeff


November 8th, 2009
www.brokenbeard.com/

The Dreaded Press

There are some bands who strive after a mastery of songwriting, chasing the ideal of the instantly familiar yet permanently memorable tune down countless ever-narrower and stranger alleyways – the Radioheads of the world, if you will. On the other hand, there are bands who are content with mastery – no, not mastery, ownership – of a particular style or sound, be it brand new or total retro. They don’t care much about breaking new ground with song structure or poetic insight; what they care about is plugging in, turning everything up to eleven and getting it on. Both types are equally important, though they fulfil different needs… Sun Gods in Exile are clearly one of the latter, as ably demonstrated by the ten tracks of thick’n'crunchy stoner-blues-rawk that comprise Black Light, White Lines.

Oh, yes – if you like your classic hard rock delivered with modern clarity, Sun Gods In Exile are going to be right up your street. They veer into cheddar territory every now and again, but it’s all done with a certain panache and boldness – like Ed Mundell busting out old Aerosmith and AC/DC licks in the practice room after a few beers and a smoke, maybe – and there’s no bullshit hair-metal posturing. They do talk about getting wrecked a fair bit, though… but when you’ve got a vocalist who flip-flops between sounding like Alice Cooper and Bon Scott fronting a band who sound like a version of The Cult (Sonic Temple era) who’ve just spent seven months living on cheap blow and moonshine in some seedy bar in the Deep South, that’s more than forgivable.

So, Black Light, White Lines is thundering drums, power chords a-plenty and searing pentatonic solos served with a wah-wah sauce; blues-rawk business as usual in other words. But if you’re a junkie for tone – the rich warm sound of quality guitars squeezing through a few pedals and into a cranked valve amp by someone who’s been doing it for years and who still clearly fucking loves it as much as the day he bought his first Marshall – this is your band. They sound good; they sound loud; they sound surly; they sound fun.

I put it to you that Black Light, White Lines is a great album to drive to, or to drink to (but not both at once, obviously, because not only is that illegal, it’s fucking stupid). Sure, you might not remember the details of the songs tomorrow… but isn’t waking up with vague memories of good times what the rock’n'roll lifestyle of fast drugs, hard liquor and loose women is all about? Of course it is – and any time you wanna recapture that feeling, Sun Gods In Exile have got your back.

- The Editor


September 11th, 2009
www.rock-metal-music-reviews.com/

Cosmic Lava

It's not often that I'm particularly impressed by a new band, but the debut album from SUN GODS IN EXILE hit the bullseye. Since the day I received my last promo package from Small Stone Records it's almost impossible for me to get this disc out of my player. Founded in early 2008 by former members of Cortez and Ocean, SUN GODS IN EXILE is a high-octane rock 'n' roll machine, driven by the spirit of the 70's. However, this doesn't mean that they are a new retro hardrock band. They're rolling through the current decade, but the band is aware of the roots and tradition of its ancestors. While some of the so-called classic rock bands sound as if they only make music for people over forty, SUN GODS OF EXILE don't have much in common with dusty twelve-bar blues rock. This should also be of interest to younger generations. It would be unfair to pick out only one member of the band, but the vocals of guitarist Adam Hitchcock are just top-class: authentic, bluesy, snotty and bursting with emotion. That's just pefect, especially for this style of rock.

On the front cover and inside the booklet one can see several muscle cars, but this fits marvellously to the heavy rock 'n' roll of SUN GODS IN EXILE. Even if you never had the chance to drive a '69 GTO this album gives you the feeling of cruising on an endless highway. There are also a few suprises such as 'Heaven Help Us All' with an additional NWOBHM edge. Some songs have been strongly influenced by the good old southern rock, but are still fresh and downright dynamic. And last but not least, this four guys are skilled in writing extremely catchy songs. Here are songs like 'Rise Up', 'Mexico' or 'Turbo Fire' that I can't get out of my mind. Have I already mentioned the additional keyboards in 'Black Magic'? Awesome! The band is not afraid to write songs that are emotionally varied. Like several times before, Small Stone Records has a pretty good hand in detecting exceedingly good bands and SUN GODS IN EXILE is no exception. Believe me or not, but here we have the next killer album in 2009. What for a great year for good music!

 - KK

 


September 29th, 2009
www.cosmiclava.com

Planet Fuzz

Have you ever searched for drug a that would get your adrenaline racing so fast that the world seemed to be a blur to your eyes? I have, and it's called Sun Gods In Exile. Taking parts of the great southern rock bands of the past and adding a little touch of 80's hard rock, Sun Gods deliver on all levels.

What you get with Black Light, White Lines, is a 425 Hemi with 420lb's of torque, all muscle. Four to the floor, pedal to the medal, this album was made for highway travel. Riff after riff of driving pleasure from the music, one can hear a triple mix of great southern grandfathers of years before (Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot, Lynyrd Skynyrd). To call them retro though, would not do them justice, as what they have taken from the past, is just a blueprint for the onslaught of southern riffs that they have updated and called their own. Their sound also touches upon the early 80's cock rock, but done with the confidence of a band that can deliver on any given day or night.

I can say you will find no filler on this album (Small Stone has once again found a hidden gem for a band). Each song brings it, from start to the finish, you'll be throttled. There's no point in picking any one song as a highlight, as each song represents a highlight on its own. Eye for an Eye, Heaven Help Us, Mexico, Rise Up, The Gripper etc..... all the way thru to the closing masterpiece 495, its just non-stop listening pleasure. By far, to me, one of the best releases this year. A blistering start from this band, their debut album is a great addition for any hardrock fan. Turn it up to 11 and head out on the highway for a full scale pleasure ride....

- Will Bissonette


August 21st, 2009
www.planetfuzz.net/fuzz.php

The Cutting Edge

It’s been a long time coming for this Portland, Maine outfit but one listen to Black Light White Lines and it’s obvious the band have been doing their homework. For a debut, this is amazingly strong boasting a balls-to-the-wall rhythm section and a bulldozing duel guitar attack. The vocals are gritty with a shade of Lemmy especially around the frayed edges. We could even make comparisons to The Rods or Tank with a Southern drawl. The licks come in spades from the catchy “Eye For An Eye” to the bass-thumping “Black Magic” and head-pounding “The Gripper”. The four-piece don’t try to reinvent the wheel, experiment with mind-numbing jams or attempt to be something they’re not. They are a rock band and this IS a rock record. Like their idols Aerosmith and Lynyrd Skynyrd, SGIE actually work on the song structure before committing it to vinyl. Therefore songs like “Heaven Help Us All” and “Hellwell” are not only heavy as hell but spiced with a generous dose of retro riffs and sidewinding solos. The open chord fuzz of “Turbo Fire” should really be played through an 8-track in a ’74 Camaro with the ol’ Zenith speakers for full effect. Closer “495” is a plodding “Simple Man”-grinder sung with that ragged out voice we all get at 4 in the morning. The guitars shake and tremble, then, like “Highway Song” ignite over driving backend in a flurry of rapid fire notes that leave holes where the speaker cabinets once where.

- Todd K Smith


July, 2009 - Issue # 67
www.cuttingedgerocks.com

The Portland Daily Sun

Portland has needed a good “rock” rock record for a long time. We finally got us one. To make sure we’re on the same page, let's establish that I’m talking rock for those who dig Fu Manchu, Nebula, Clutch and the Atomic Bitchwax.

 If you’re feeling me, let’s carry on.

It's no surprise that guitarist Tony D’Agostino is involved. Over the years, Tony has taken shots with some pretty good rock outfits in and out of town, but this is by far his best band to date. The debut record, “Black Light White Lines” is well produced, smokey, stoney, highway star, mountain rock. It’s the middle finger hood ornament on an 18-wheeler that's driving fast and heavy through the desert transporting nothing but cases of cold domestic beer.

This local rock piñata is jammed with killer treats like ZZ Top, Chrome Locusts, Judas Priest, Molly Hatchet, Monster Magnet and most certainly Skynard. Besides D’Agostino, the band also features J. Lennon of Ocean on bass and frontman Adam Hitchcock, who sang for the Twisted Roots offshoot band, Black Apple. Safe to say all of the fellas, John Kennedy included on drums, found their new thing and hopefully will stick with it. We need it around here.

- Mark Curdo


July 21st, 2009
www.portlanddailysun.me

The Phoenix

The Sun Gods do their best to stomp you right in the face, with rock that's neither southern (okay, "Hellwell" is) or pop, but hard-driving and front-grill-of-the-motorcycle gritty. They have history in spades, with a resume that includes Swampwitch Revival, Novadose, Lost Cause Desperadoes, Dirtnap, Ocean, Black Apple, and Supersoul Challenger, but this new project has been picked up by Detroit's Small Stone Records, which took them to record at Mad Oak Studios outside of Boston and do mastering at Baseline Audio in Ann Arbor.

This is probably a better record than that Chickenfoot band with Satriani and Hagar (if you're into that kind of thing), with all of the guitar pyrotechnics and blood-curdling vocals, but not trying to be more than it is: a big rock record.

The guitars are often split, so when vocalist/guitarist Adam Hitchcock and guitarist Tony D'Agostino (né Vegas) duel, you get one in each ear. Maybe there's a rhythm foundation, then a peal of fingers dragging down the fretboard ("Heaven Help Us All"), maybe drummer Johnny Kennedy pounds out a gun-shot opening before being overthrown by merciless guitar bouncers ("Rise Up"). Regardless, it never takes long for the riffage to ensue and for Hitchcock to lay right into you.

"Turbo Fire" is the apex of the guitar heat, clocking in near five minutes and never wasting a note. But if you think that's hot, inhale the seven-plus minutes of "495," which opens with peals of thunder and a melody line to drink to at 1 am, then gives you a speed rush to help you make it till sunrise.

- Sam Pfeifle


June 24th, 2009
thephoenix.com/Portland/

AllMusic.com

The fact that Black Light, White Lines, the debut album from Portland, ME's Sun Gods in Exile, emerged barely one year after the band's inception says something, not only about the group's immediate and strong impression upon Small Stone, the record label that signed it, but also about the importance of feeling over calculation, as exemplified by the group's spontaneous classic rock songwriting. Opener "Eye for an Eye," for example, sounds like Cheap Trick's "Hot Love" shot through with raging distortion, and it's not even as interesting as subsequent offerings like "Heaven Help Us All" and "The Gripper," which feature slower seductive grooves and fuzz-drenched lysergic guitar solos. Inconsistency occasionally trips up the album's progress along the way, however, as rather mundane, thrown-together numbers like "Rise Up," "Mexico," and the unusually foreboding title track battle for space with more inspired fare like the Southern rockers "Hellwell" and "495" (not bad for a band from Maine!), plus the organ-enhanced "Black Magic." To be fair, the casual jam feel of those weaker cuts also has a certain appeal, and as evidenced by another album standout, the AC/DC-inspired hard rock scorcher "Turbo Fire" (very reminiscent of "Riff Raff"), Sun Gods in Exile are perfectly capable of composing a tightly wound, fully focused -- and explosive -- single, if they so wish. Which they may think about doing more of next time around, but not if it's at the expense of that spontaneous charm -- that's the sort of quality that epitomizes great rock & roll, and which happens to be in short demand nowadays.

 - Eduardo Rivadavia


June 21st, 2009
www.allmusic.com

Planet Fuzz

Have you ever searched for drug a that would get your adrenaline racing so fast that the world seemed to be a blur to your eyes? I have, and it's called Sun Gods In Exile. Taking parts of the great southern rock bands of the past and adding a little touch of 80's hard rock, Sun Gods deliver on all levels.

What you get with Black Light, White Lines, is a 425 Hemi with 420lb's of torque, all muscle. Four to the floor, pedal to the medal, this album was made for highway travel. Riff after riff of driving pleasure from the music, one can hear a triple mix of great southern grandfathers of years before (Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot, Lynyrd Skynyrd). To call them retro though, would not do them justice, as what they have taken from the past, is just a blueprint for the onslaught of southern riffs that they have updated and called their own. Their sound also touches upon the early 80's cock rock, but done with the confidence of a band that can deliver on any given day or night.

I can say you will find no filler on this album (Small Stone has once again found a hidden gem for a band). Each song brings it, from start to the finish, you'll be throttled. There's no point in picking any one song as a highlight, as each song represents a highlight on its own. Eye for an Eye, Heaven Help Us, Mexico, Rise Up, The Gripper etc..... all the way thru to the closing masterpiece 495, its just non-stop listening pleasure. By far, to me, one of the best releases this year. A blistering start from this band, their debut album is a great addition for any hardrock fan. Turn it up to 11 and head out on the highway for a full scale pleasure ride....

- Will Bissonette


June 1st, 2009
http://www.planetfuzz.net/fuzz.php

Sleazegrinder

Portland has always been a hotbed of musical madness. Oh, wait, we’re talking about Portland, Maine, not Oregon. Well, I can’t speak to the music fertility of that region in general, but I can speak to one sliver of it in particular: Sun Gods in Exile. The bonecrunching/chewing/swallowing quartet reminds me of the late, great Four Horsemen, as obsessed with Lynyrd Skynyrd as Aerosmith. Adam Hitchcock and Tony D’Agostino slather every inch of these songs with six-string glaze, letting riffs, solos and power chords do most of the communicating. But not all of it; tracks like The Gripper, Hellwell and Eye For An Eye boast actual tunes, the kind that would work with acoustic guitars (though why anybody’d want that I dunno). 495, meanwhile, is the kind of classic, lighter-waving, concert anthem no one (but these guys) writes this well anymore. It doesn’t hurt that Hitchcock sounds like Alice Cooper when he was still drunk, arrogant and unChristian. Sure, you’ve heard this stuff before, but SGiE boasts a palpable enthusiasm and an inherent tunefulness that sets the band apart from the heavy rock pack. Maybe growing up in isolation in that other Portland was a good thing after all.

- Michael Toland
 


June 1st, 2009
www.sleazegrinder.com

The Obelisk

It’s a good thing the High Council of Stoner Rock hasn’t yet instituted mandatory tests for performance enhancers, because I’m pretty sure that if they did, Portland, Maine’s Sun Gods in Exile would come up with O.D.-levels of testosterone in their blood. Their Small Stone debut, Black Light, White Lines is dick swingin’ brawl and roll dudelier than all those extreme fisherman they show on the Discovery Channel off the New England coast. Think AC/DC, Skynyrd and a toxic amount of liquor, and you’re off and running.

It took me a while to get into Black Light, White Lines. At first the album hit me as a throwaway that didn’t offer much original or exciting for me to sink my teeth into, but after a few listens, and particularly after warming up to the lead vocals of guitarist Adam Hitchcock, it proved to be an unpretentious jaunt through classic guitar rock that Sun Gods in Exile passionately — and probably drunkenly — set to tape with the arrogant gusto necessary to really pull it off. Snarling, biting and wiseassed, tunes like “The Gripper” and “Mexico” exemplify the barroom belligerence carrying Black Light, White Lines across like the kind of album that claims “manifest destiny” as the reason it infects your brain.

A slower riff pervades the title track, but the Southern take of “Hellwell” offsets any shift in mood, bringing the spotlight back to the band’s rocking side with a catchy chorus enhanced by bassist JL’s backing vocals. Guitarist Anthony D’Agostino (ex-Cortez) sets a quicker pace for “Black Magic,” while drummer/vocalist Johnny Kennedy keeps ready time with the snare and ride. One of several especially wailing solos appears in later track “Turbo Fire,” and Black Light, White Lines wraps with “495,” the longest and most Skynyrd cut of all. Even at 7:32, it doesn’t overstay its welcome, as several changes in pace and tone serve to keep the song interesting for the duration.

It’s a Northern highway song delivered in the Southern tradition, exemplifying at last a contrast playing out over the course of the album as a whole. A big part of what initially disturbed be about Sun Gods in Exile, I now see it as what makes the band unique. There’s a bit of their region seeping into their songs without their even knowing it — doubtless recording at Mad Oak Studios with Benny Grotto helped bring it out — and like a younger Roadsaw, they infuse their sound with an inexplicable Northern intensity even as the riffs drawl and spit tobacco on the floor of the bar. I’m still not sure if I’d call myself a 100 percent convert, but what these Sun Gods are preaching is starting to make a whole lot of sense.

- H.P. Taskmaster


May 20th, 2009
theobelisk.net/

The Ripple Effect

Fans of Tank and The Rods rejoice!

Not only are both bands back in action but now you have a new favorite band – Sun Gods In Exile. They’re based out of Portland, Maine and were formed a little over a year ago but sound like the younger brothers of Molly Hatchet in 1979. Bright Light, White Lines is their debut album and it’s out now on Small Stone Records.

Sun Gods In Exile play no nonsense hard rockin metal with no discernible influences past 1982. That’s good. The songs are all fast, hard hitting and you can smell the blood, guts & beer. In their short time together, they’ve shared the stage with Roadsaw, Hackman, Mess With The Bull, The Brought Low and many others. That should give you a pretty good idea of where these guys are coming from.

“Eye For An Eye” kicks off the record like it’s something from Wild Dogs by The Rods and gets you nodding your head right away. When the vocals kicked in the first time I listened to this thing I had to double check to make sure I hadn’t put on Tank’s Power of the Hunter by mistake. Adam Hitchcock’s voice sounds like a cross between the mighty Algy Ward and Molly Hatchet’s Danny Joe Brown. When he screams out “downstairs I smell the cocaine” I had to turn it up and play the song again. Always a good way to start an album.

“Heaven Help Us” is a distant cousin of “Stranglehold” and is followed by the Judas Priest southern boogie of “The Gripper” (a title that I’m surprised that Priest hasn’t used yet). In a just world “Rise Up” would be played on FM rock radio during afternoon drive time to help you get the Led out.

After that it’s a trip to “Mexico” with some Nazareth style cowbell and an Ace Frehley-ish guitar solo. I’m sure these guys are no stranger to Acapulco Gold. And if the title track doesn’t make you want to light up and give cops the bird, then it’s time to surrender your copy of One More From The Road. “Hellwell” has a real Brought Low feel to it, meaning it sounds like a cross between Skynyrd and AC/DC with some great melodic guitar fills. “Black Magic” is not a cover of the Slayer jam but continues in the AC/DC “Sin City” vein and features some moody organ playing. The album finishes up with the twin peaks of “Turbo Fire” and “495”. The songs aren’t necessarily about cars or driving fast but they’re plenty oily. “495” has a nice “Freebird” jam at the end that kicks ass.

The production on Bright Light, White Lines is great. The guitars of Hitchcock and Anthony D'Agostino sound huge and heavy and the ace rhythm section of bassist JL and drummer Johnny Kennedy boom and thud in a most pleasant way. All of the instruments have room to breathe in the mix and leave plenty of room for the vocals.

I haven’t had a chance to play this in my car but it would be the perfect thing to listen to on a road trip to see a Montrose (1st album) reunion.

--Woody
 


May 14th, 2009
www.ripplemusic.blogspot.com/

StonerRock.com

Listen up, screwheads, if you’re gonna be in a rock n roll band, you gotta have solos. That’s a universal truth, just like beer goes well with more beer and if it’s too loud, you’re too old. And yet some dunderheads can’t grasp this basic fact.

Not so with Tony “Leadeye” D'Agostino, guitarist of Portland, Maine’s Sun Gods in Exile (ever so briefly Burnt Orange, presumably until the Crayola Corp. came down on them like a ton of earthern hued bricks). In fact, at times I was convinced the ten tracks on debut Black Light, White Lines were nothing more than conduits for his leads. “Hey, I got solos up the ying-yang, what should I do with them?” “Uh, let’s write some songs, I guess.”

That’s not to imply that Black Light, White Lines is a throwaway album, because it’s not - unless you want nothing to do with straightforward classic hard rock that’s pretty much solely preoccupied with cheap booze, cheaper blow, dirty women, and good times. And a veritable shit ton of solos. In my book, that adds up to some damn good tunes.

Unlike a fair amount of fellow Small Stone groups, Sun Gods in Exile (along with D’Agostino, there’s Adam Hitchcock on vocals, Johnny Kennedy on drums, and Ocean’s JL – yes, the glacially slow Ocean – on bass) takes the usual ‘70’s influences and incorporates a healthy amount of early ‘80’s cock rock swagger. It’s not so much defined in any specific moment, except maybe in the title track, which, if it were a video, would feature the band walking down a darkened street on a cold night, ultimately arriving at an abandoned warehouse, setting up their gear, and rocking out. It’s more about the general attitude and delivery. And really, if you’re going to name a song “Turbo Fire,” it sure as hell ought to sound like it was written around the same time as Screaming for Vengeance or Love at First Sting. (Those who prefer their bitchin’ Camaro rock to pre-date the Reagan administration, I’ll direct your attention to “Eye for an Eye,” “The Gripper,” “Hell Well,” and closing number “495,” which probably should’ve been titled “A Simple Man and His Very Free Bird.”)

Sure, my days of howling at the moon are long gone, but that doesn’t mean I still can’t get a visceral kick out of Sun Gods in Exile. After all, if it’s too loud, then you’re too old. Recommended.

 - John Pegoraro


March 7th, 2009
www.stonerrock.com

Album Tracks

  1. Eye For An Eye
  2. Heaven Help Us All
  3. The Gripper
  4. Rise Up
  5. Mexico
  6. Black Light White Lines
  7. Hellwell
  8. Black Magic
  9. Turbo Fire
  10. 495

More Stuff...