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Shame Club
Come On

SS-080/2008

The Shame Club is:
Jon Lumley: Lead Vocals & Guitar
Andy White: Guitar
Eric Eyster: Bass & Vocals
Ken McCray: Drums & Background Vocals

Recorded at the Mousetrap in Norman, OK.
Engineered and Mixed by Carl Amburn.
Mastered by Chris Goosman at Baseline Audio - Ann Arbor, MI.
Artwork by Brian "The Butcher" Cox.

Reviews for Come On...

Cosmic Lava

I love reviewing a release from a band I've never heard of when the album turns out to be amazing! SHAME CLUB play blues-infected rock 'n' roll, combining elements of bands like Led Zeppelin, Black Crowes, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and the like. Powerful hook lines and plenty of variety are two of the most outstanding trademarks of 'Come On' and as a result you won't find no boring tracks among the included twelve cuts. SHAME CLUB roll through their sound with a precision that only comes from solid practice and it's always really tight and heavy. Although they draw most of their influences from the 1970's, this band isn't trying to re-animate the vintage sound from the golden period of heavy rock. They have transmitted some of the best elements from that decade into the current time, and prove that good music is timeless. The entire vibe of 'Come On' is uplifting and very positive without becoming cheesy for a minute. SHAME CLUB show that not only dark music can be intense and that it's also important not to forget about the good things in life. So, the album title can also be seen as an advice to step out of the shadow and take a look at the bright sun. This album has been released through Small Stone Records in 2008 and as usual the label offers high quality. 'Come On' is definitely worth picking up and I bet these four guys are amazing live!

 - KK
 


December, 2008
www.cosmiclava.com

Leicester Bangs (UK)

In reviews passing we’ve been unstinting in our praise for Detroit’s Small Stone label, and their recent absence from these pages is certainly no reflection on the quality of their current output. In point of fact their 2008 releases have not only maintained previous high standards of rock and metal but have also taken significant steps towards broadening the artistic and creative scope of their roster.

If any of the current crop can be labelled “traditional” Small Stone it’s likely to be Shame Club, indebted as they are to some familiar seventies sounds. On their new album “Come In”, the third track, “How Far”, tears out of the traps like a second cousin to “Fireball”, while “Don’t Feel like Making Love” echoes a darker, denser Deep Purple with some roughly chopped Zeppelin riffs thrown in. Like many of their stable mates, however, they spice things up with more contemporary influences including the likes of QOTSA and the less radio-friendly efforts of the Foo Fighters, particularly in the heavily disguised but nonetheless evident melody that characterises songs such as “Jonestown” and “Ten” and the surprising acoustic instrumental “Alicia Circles”.

 -  Neil B
 


November 24th, 2008
www.leicesterbangs.co.uk

Heavy Metal Time Machine

St. Louis based Shame Club seem to approach their music like the last 33 years or so never happened. Being on the label they are on and due to popular trends this band might get the stoner rock label slapped on them, but that wouldn't really be fair. This is pure late 60's-early 70's hard hitting rock that never stops. The influences are plenty including The Who, Mountain, Hendrix, Thin Lizzy, early Aerosmith and ZZtop. Yet despite the numerous influences the songs themselves still seem remarkably fresh and vibrant. My best guess is that they just this style so much that they passionately rip and tear into every little nook and cranny of their material. There are a number of bands playing early 70's influenced hard rock or metal yet most them seem more like tributes because they follow one or two bands so closely without leaving a trace of themselves. Shame Club mix and stir the styles and their almost frantic approach to the pace and the stellar jams sets them apart. The way they attack their music reminds me of of a live show in the 70's where there's a bit of an over the top, impromptu jam powered performance. After absorbing "Come on" I felt like I had finished a feast that was full of a great of variety, yet instead of feeling stuffed I felt the desire for more. This is a splendid and completely satisfying display of real early style hard rock.

 


June 29, 2008
metalmark.blogspot.com

Gears Of Rock

Shame Club is a gritty rock ‘n roll band whose 12-track release Come On bursts with a wide array of ’70s hard rock flavor from Southern fried to guitar-hero. Humungous hooks, monstrous sounds, solid musicanship, and a true sense of danger all assist this disc in taking you outside and promptly giving you the ass-kicking you deserve. Served best with a bottle of Jack, Shame Club’s raucous and rousing rock ‘n roll reaffirms faith that fat backbeated guitar heavy hasn’t become merely a nostalgia trip on the FM dial.

- Mike SOS


September 3rd, 2008
www.gearsofrock.com

Penny Black Music (UK)

Shame Club are a four-man rock outfit from Saint Louis, Missouri with an alleged fondness for 1970's American hard rock in the vein of ZZ Top and Aerosmith, chased down with a dash of speedier late-70's fare like the Ramones.

That sounds like a winning combination for rock fans, but something about most of ‘Come On’, their third album, but first album for noted heavy rock label Small Stone, doesn’t quite hang together.

The riffs powering tunes like ‘How Far’ cop their moves from outfits like AC/DC but don’t reach far enough to distinguish them from the chugalug tunes being peddled by unsung local bar band, as well as sticking around past their due date. The pleading tones of lead singer Jon Lumley are lightly limned with post-grunge angst, which may be a draw for some but subtly undermine tunes like ‘Don’t Feel Like Making Love’. A raunchier approach would likely have worked better (and made the song seem amusingly smartass, instead of a bit whiney).

There are undoubtedly hard rockers out there more than ready to bang their heads to Shame Club’s chunky southern-tinged rock; reports also describe a blistering live show. However, ‘Come On’ isn’t the first album to turn to when you need a good dose of hard rock.

 - Andrew Carver
 


September 15th, 2008
www.pennyblackmusic.co.uk

Aquarian Weekly

The harmonized vocals and pervading positive mood of Shame Club come through almost immediately with their Small Stone debut, Come On. The Saint Louis band are something of an anomaly on the Small Stone roster, being neither strictly in the Southern or stoner rock vein (I hear tell the Detroit label is going to release an outlaw country record before the year’s out, so change is in the air), but having elements of both worked into their sound, which in itself is surprisingly clean and tidy.

Come On sounds professional — almost too professional for its own good and bordering on commercial. That is, until you take a listen and remember what real commercial hard rock sounds like. Rest assured, this ain’t it, and yes, that is a compliment. The ‘70s-inspired good-times groove is about as likely to be heard in an iPod commercial as is Deicide, but the accessible nature of a tune like the übercatchy “I Just Want You To Be Free” is undeniable.

Cuts like “Can You Feel It,” the acoustic instrumental “Alicia Circles” (note the shaker in the background) and bluesy “Sweet Mercy’s Gate” offer some much-needed diversity, but if Come On has a single focus, that focus is unpretentious, upbeat, somewhat Southern hard rock; like what the Black Crowes might have been if they didn’t suck so much. Their mission is noble. Their presentation could use just a touch more edge next go round, but they’re off to an admirable start.

 - JJ Koczan
 


August 13th, 2008
www.theaquarian.com

All Access Magazine

Wow, right out of the gate, you are hit with loud, hard-pounding drums and bass guitar, that literally bangs like a punch in the face. A minute fifty later, it’s over! But wait, the next song is just the same, only this time, they brought a gang of vocals with them. This CD is kicking my ass and I like it. This is old school hard hitting Midwestern rock-n-roll. This here is the CD, “Come On” by St. Louis refugees SHAME CLUB. It’s a shame if you’re not getting into this. That’s O.K. we didn’t want you in this Club. It’s a Club for people who liked this guitar rock in the late 60’s and throughout the 70’s. Those of us who still love it today, knowing it never went away. Thank God for those kids who are going back and bringing this genre into the modern age. The band members who are guilty of the rough housing on this CD are; guitarist and lead vocalist Jon Lumley, who pairs so very well with guitarist Andy White. The powerful locomotive of a rhythm section is Eric Eyster on bass/vocals, with Ken McCray pounding the skins and leaving the beats while he too adds vocals. If you put it all together, you get one hell of a CD, by a hard working blue collar kind of band.. I really like the crunchy riffs in songs like, “Light Shines”, which starts out like “Revolution” , adds a big drum beat and more guitar. There’s also the groove laden rocker, “Johnstown” and the crunchy riff is still there in “Chism”. To mix it up, they added a touching acoustic jam called “Alicia Circles”. But the “hit” would have to be the GRAND FUNKish, “Can You Feel It”. Hey, the band MOTHER SUPERIOR have been doing this for years and now they have company in SHAME CLUB. So,” come on” and welcome to the Club. This CD is a keeper!

 - The Rocker
 


July 24th, 2008
http://allaccessmagazine.com

Daredevil Records (Germany)

Small Stones new signing SHAME CLUB is a blast! The opener TRANSAMERICA is a short forward rocking track in best SOUNDGARDEN or PEARL JAM tradition. TRANSAMERICA sounds fresh and is full of energy, it is electrifying and the dynamic combination produces between the musicians every hard rock band wants. I JUST WANT YOU TO BE FREE, the following song shows the musical basement of the band: shredding guitar licks, thumping bass grooves, evil drum beats and wailing vocals. The song reminds me again to the good old time, bands like SOUNDGARDEN or PEARL JAM were unknown and playing in small bars and clubs. HOW FAR opens with an AC/DC Rock riff and turns into a fast rocker with excellent vocals from Jon Lumley. He is the man main in that band. Andy White on guitar, Eric Eyster on bass and vocals, and Ken McCray on drums and backing vocals did a important and good job too, but the vocals from Jon fit perfect! HOW FAR is pure AC/DC! And that is good! DON`T FEEL LIKE MAKING LOVE and the rocking LIGHT SHINES  Don`t expect something new, COME ON pays tribute to a lot of the great traditions in rock music. St. Louis` loudest band and riff-rock preservationists blew me away with their Small Stone debut COME ON! I had a hell of a good time listening to that record.

Shame Club goes right to the root of rock, punk, and alternative, aggressively capturing those genres’ power-chord-driven, angst-filled anthems with a thunderous crack. Together, this quartet from Detroit, Michigan is well on its way ( they started in 2000). The band consists of Jon Lumley on guitar and lead vocals, Andy White on guitar, Eric Eyster on bass and vocals, and Ken McCray on drums and backing vocals. Part of what makes Shame Club so powerful is the fact that each of its members can stand alone on their own musical talent. Each adds to the character of each song. "Come On" pays tribute to a lot of the great traditions in rock music. These are rock journeyman that talk the talk and walk the walk. It's just the sort of music that you'd expect from a full-blooded rock 'n' roll soul band!

Genre: Rock
Music: 9
Sound: 8
Info: 12 Songs / 56 minutes

 - Jochen
 


August 1st, 2008
www.daredevilrecords.de

AllMusic.com

With no record label waiting in the wings, ready to release it, Shame Club's third album, Come On, was recorded at a leisurely pace between 2006 and '07, and even though the long-running St. Louis hard rockers would probably choose a slightly less positive adjective than ‘leisurely' (‘tortuous,' perhaps), their patience certainly paid off when Detroit's Small Stone picked up the record for a mid-2008 release. By then, the quartet had relinquished some of the disproportionate Thin Lizzy influence that had characterized their early work, and opened up their sound to a broader palette of classic rock cornerstones like Aerosmith and ZZ Top -- all evident to differing degrees in songs like "Transamerica," "Light Shines" and "Chasm." There's also a discernible Southern rock aesthetic filtering into the twangy licks of "How Far," the bombastic boogie of "I Ain't Surprised," and the melancholy melodies of "Sweet Mercy's Gate"; an early ‘70s blues-rock simplicity (think Bad Company, Foghat and BTO) keeping others like "Don't Feel Like Making Love" and "Can You Feel It" honest and straightforward; and an even more retro, post-flower-power vibe permeating the otherwise thumpin' "I Just Want You to Be Free." Finally, the band takes it down a notch for the acoustic instrumental, "Alicia Circles," which is reminiscent of Zeppelin's "Bron-Yr-Aur," only with a hillbilly instead of Welsh folk flavor, and then closes the album with an extended, tipsy blues jam called "Lurch." With all of these recognizable influences flowing through its gears, one might expect Come On to live out the image on its cover and sink to the bottom of the murky Mississippi, in abject anonymity. But, if anything, Shame Club's wholesale reshuffling of all these elements renders the whole pretty natural in its own way. Its overall sense of restraint may all still prove pretty boring and sedate for new millennium listeners, tweaked on impatience and adrenalin, but classic rock lovers will likely get a huge kick out of sifting through these songs' familiar sonic hallmarks.

 - Eduardo Rivadavia


July 22nd, 2008
www.allmusic.com

SLUG Magazine

Shame Club = Kyuss + KISS + Kick Ass

I was totally expecting this cd to suck on it big time in a lame ass stoner garage rock way. Boy oh boy was I surprised. This damn shit is bad ass. May the Shame Club live on in glory? This business comes out you non-stop and beats your face in while you scream for joy. Shame Club does play a fuzzed out thick bunch of noise but it’s dynamic. It’s like if Stone Temple Pilots hated being weird artsy drug addicts and decided to listen to some good home-style blues and smoke all the weed they could find while hoped up on Pixie Stix and decided to serenade all the dandelions into head banging their yellow heads off. There is no shame in pimpin’ out the Shame Club because they are just too pimp!!

 – Jon Robertson
 


July 2008
www.slugmag.com

The Ripple Effect

Playing an amped up, fired-up brand of southern-fried, classic seventies rock, Shame Club start off their new disc like a racehorse chomping on the bit, kicking at the starting gate, just waiting for it's chance to stretch it's legs and run. "Transamerica," rumbles out of the speakers, all stuttering, chugging riffs and circling bass. You've heard this song before, not really, but you've always wanted to. Somewhere in the back of your brain, if you knew how to write music, you'd want to write this song. And damn, you'd love to play it live.

"I Just Want You to be Free," follows, emphasizing one of the many things that separates Shame Club from their contemporaries. This isn't stoner rock, it's a fresh take on the classic vibes of the seventies. Heavy and thundering, yet melodic and sweeping, this is Lenny Kravitz with extra muscle. Aerosmith before the movie soundtracks and insipid ballads, beefed up and roughed up with a modern touch. It's seventies rock dropping down into the south on a touch of speed, filtered through a six-pack of Red Bull. It's surprisingly melodic and soulful vocals, harmonizing over riffs the size of Mt. Rushmore. It's actually lots of things, and they're all good.

- Racer
 


July 14th, 2007
www.ripplemusic.blogspot.com

Jersey Beat

Shame Club are a music reviewer’s dream come true! You always hope to find that one-in-a-million band that grabs you my the throat, pulls your brain out, turns it upside down, and puts it back in. By the end of the disc you can't tell up from down, but you know you that you just had a hell of a good time! And damn if Shame Club doesn't sound like the second coming of Vanilla Fudge! Pure Rock 'N' Roll! Period! On songs like "Transamerica," "I Just Want You to be Free," or "How Far," for starters, Shame Club goes right to the root of rock, punk, and alternative, aggressively capturing those genres’ power-chord-driven, angst-filled anthems with a thunderous crack. Together, this quartet from Detroit, Michigan is well on its way (they started in 2000). The band consists of Jon Lumley on guitar and lead vocals, Andy White on guitar, Eric Eyster on bass and vocals, and Ken McCray on drums and backing vocals. Part of what makes Shame Club so powerful is the fact that each of its members can stand alone on their own musical talent. Each adds to the character of each song. "Come On" pays tribute to a lot of the great traditions in rock music. These are rock journeyman that talk the talk and walk the walk. It's just the sort of music that you'd expect from a full-blooded rock 'n' roll soul band!

 - Phil Rainone


June 29th, 2008
www.jerseybeat.com

Pivotal Rage

St. Louis based Shame Club seem to approach their music like the last 33 years or so never happened. Being on the label they are on and due to popular trends this band might get the stoner rock label slapped on them, but that wouldn't really be fair. This is pure late 60's-early 70's hard hitting rock that never stops. The influences are plenty including The Who, Mountain, Hendrix, Thin Lizzy, early Aerosmith and ZZtop. Yet despite the numerous influences the songs themselves still seem remarkably fresh and vibrant. My best guess is that they just this style so much that they passionately rip and tear into every little nook and cranny of their material. There are a number of bands playing early 70's influenced hard rock or metal yet most them seem more like tributes because they follow one or two bands so closely without leaving a trace of themselves. Shame Club mix and stir the styles and their almost frantic approach to the pace and the stellar jams sets them apart. The way they attack their music reminds me of of a live show in the 70's where there's a bit of an over the top, impromptu jam powered performance. After absorbing "Come on" I felt like I had finished a feast that was full of a great of variety, yet instead of feeling stuffed I felt the desire for more. This is a splendid and completely satisfying display of real early style hard rock. - Metal Mark
June 30th, 2008
webzine.pivotalalliance.com

The Cutting Edge

Shame Club is unequivocally '70s hard rock with a mix of punk attitude and Neanderthal rhythms. They pay attention to the deeper cuts of classic vinyl. Within their music are bits and pieces of Ten Years After, Grand Funk and Mountain with melodies that aren't immediately catchy but pack a punch. They worship the almighty riff and use the nimble fingers of Andy White and Jon Lumley to build a wall of sound that not only rocks, but also maintains sonic texture. Lumley also sings and uses his soulful voice, which occasionally sounds like Lenny Kravitz, to proclaim his lust for fast women "How Far," his forlorn "Sweet Mercy’s Gate" and his ode to the break up in "Lurch" with the sympathetic line, "You think your heart's been broken girl / Well, I think it's only been bruised.” Bassist Eric Eyster and drummer Ken McCray give the Saint Louis quartet a serious kick whether it's in the chugging engine of "Transamerica" or the more subdued "Light Solace." There's also the Southern / Blues element that keeps the whole thing honest, heart felt and well crafted. Listen for the musical chemistry in the acoustic front porch jammer "Alicia Circles" and the thundering "Jonestown." And you might get a chuckle as they spin the whole retro vibe with songs like "Don't Feel Like Making Love," "I Ain't Surprised" and "Can You Feel It" all packaged up in the killer artwork of Bryan "The Butcher" Cox. - Todd K Smith
June, 2008 - Issue #65
www.cuttingedgerocks.com

Pine Bluff Commercial

Small Stone records has two main focuses - both of which in today's musical culture tend to find themselves intertwined. Those are stoner/ psychedelic rock and pure-dee, riff-heavy rock. Shame Club falls into that latter category though not without influences from the former. The band leans most heavily on classic rock grooves. The vocals, the melodies, the guitar solos - all of it - would be right at home on some classic blues/ Southern rock album. I bet these guys listen to Mountain - though I like Shame Club much more than I really dig what little I've heard of Mountain. There's a mix of grit and melody that is balanced just the way it ought to be. The sweet, thick melodies come pouring out of the vocal and instrumental departments, both sides of the fence joining their talent and resources into the creation of an album that does, indeed, make you want to "Come On" and join up with the musical fun. - Kristofer Upjohn
June 9th, 2008

Sonic Ruin

Let's face it: most 70s-inspired rock bands reek of nostalgia. That's not to say they don't have moments of inspiration, but usually your average long-haired, blue-jeaned, Les Pauls 'n' Marshall stacks-wielding gang of roughnecks is content to ply their trade by pretending punk and Ronald Reagan never happened. Not so Shame Club. On Come On, the St. Louis quartet draws from the usual sources – Aerosmith, Thin Lizzy, ZZ Top, the dozens of one-album wonders from the early 70s. But they make it all sound fresh, as if they're inventing the vocabulary of Me-Decade hard rock before your very ears. I give credit not only to the band's firm command of the idiom, spot-on vocal harmonies and Jon Lumley's soulful keen, but to the uniformly strong songwriting. Lumley and crew aren't just hammering a basic riff to unimaginative 4/4 pounding, but penning real tunes with strong melodies, intelligent (and often casually funny) lyrics and real conviction. Gems like "Don't Feel Like Making Love," "Can You Feel It," "I Just Want You to Be Free" and "I Ain't Surprised" bear the marks of hard work in the craftsmanship department, even as they keep the loose spirit and passionate rock & roll flame burning bright. Come On is good shit. - Michael Toland
May 17th, 2008
www.sonicruin.com

StonerRock.com

Never mind the bad - there is a shit ton of good music out there, and unless you sleep no more than 15 minutes a night and have no responsibilities outside of turning up the speakers and getting your rock on, there's no possible way you're going to catch it all. Case in point - apparently Shame Club has been around long enough to release two other albums, but Come On is the first thing I've heard by the Saint Louis four-piece. It's the sort of introduction makes you slap your forehead and wonder what the hell you were thinking, letting something this fantastic slip past the radar. How good is it? Know how I've been prone to bitching about rock albums that stretch past ten tracks? The 12-song Come On not only doesn't have any weak moments, but I wouldn't have minded had it gone on even longer. It's an honest, hard working album that draws from a long list of classic rockers and fits in comfortably against contemporaries like The Brought Low, Mule, Roadsaw, The Rubes, and RPG. There's a southern undercurrent to Come On, accented by some soulful vocal harmonies and strengthened by hooks sharp enough to cut the skin. The band rarely plays it fast ("How Far" and "I Ain't Surprised" are the exceptions), instead opting to hit grooves that are just above the speed limit and fill the songs with some beautiful melodies. Songs like "Transamerica," "I Just Want You To Be Free," "Don't Feel Like Making Love" (dig the Bad Company reference), and "Jonestown" are best described as sounding big (or maybe just "awesome"). In another era, "Can You Feel It" would be a hit, heard on every half decent radio station across the nation. And closer "Lurch" is perfectly named – it's a drunken stumble of bluesy rock that tears up the eyes like that last shot of bourbon that you probably shouldn't have had. It's been a good year for rock 'n' roll and Shame Club's Come On makes it even better. A modern day classic? Too early to tell. But goddamn this is one hell of an album. Highly recommended. John Pegoraro
November 27th, 2007
stonerrock.com

Album Tracks

  1. Transamerica
  2. I Just Want You To Be Free
  3. How Far
  4. Don't Feel Like Making Love
  5. Light Shines
  6. Can You Feel It
  7. Alicia Circles
  8. Jonestown
  9. Chasm
  10. Sweet Mercy's Gate
  11. I Ain't Surprised
  12. Lurch

More Stuff...