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the Glasspack
Bridgeburner

SS-041/2004

"Dirty" Dave Johnson - Guitar/Vocals
Brett "The Cap’n" Holsclaw: Drums
Andrew "Lil’Bucky" Garret: Bass
Rico Rackutt: Steering Wheels, Buzzsaw

Additional Musicians:
Phil Durr: Guitars (tracks 2-7)
Sam Vail: Bass & Guitars (tracks 2-6)
Ed Mundell: Lead Guitar(track 11)
Bobby Pantella: Bass (track 7)
Scott Hamilton: Guitar (track 6)

Recorded at Rustbelt Studios
Engineered by Robert Burrows, Dave Allison
Mixed by Bobby Pantella
Mastered by Chris Gooseman at Solid Sound
Skulls & Flames by Mike Saputo

Reviews for Bridgeburner...

AURAL INNOVATIONS

The Glasspack have got to be one of the dirtiest, nastiest, kick assenest rock 'n' roll bands to ever come out of the Bluegrass state of Kentucky. These guys are totally stoned and fuzzed, but they aren't a stoner band in Sabbath mold. No sireeÓ these good old boys blend stoner rock, psychedelia, punk and metal, and are clearly determined to pummel their listeners into psycho fuzzed out submission with their killer brand of screaming vocals and stoner fuzzed rock 'n' roll. You wanna get a feel for a piece of these guys roots just check out their brain melting cover of the Stones' "Gimme Shelter". I think Richards and Wood would be impressed by the guitars on this tune. The Glasspack retain the classic rock 'n' roll of the original but give it their own garage psych treatment. And dig that freaked out fuzzed and wah'd guitar on "Oil Pan". Scrumptious! The title track has similarly cool guitar but this fucker just absolutely ROCKS! That's what's so great about these guysÓ they're down 'n' dirty rockers and they shoot to kill, but they can really play. Other standouts include "Barn Party", "Hydroplane" and "Getting'Shitty", killer rockers with a punky edge. I think the punk elements would make The Glasspack a sure fire hit with Motorhead fans. "Hairsoup" is the longest and most valium stoned and purely psychedelic metal song on the album. The guitars go DEEP into space and explore on this sucker. Guaranteed to turn your brain into cosmic mush. This and "Peepshow" are my favorites, the latter being a monstrous trip rock instrumental with guest guitar from Ed Mundell (Monster Magnet, Atomic Bitchwax). Heavy rockers that like lots of fuzz and freaked out rock 'n' roll insanity will love this.


Scott Heller
AI #30 (February 2005)
www.aural-innovations.com

MONOLITH (Greece)

I can discern an evil pattern forging its menacing wings in heavy rock music. When Halfway To Gone strike, The Glasspack kick; when the former flame, the latter torch. When H.T.G. rock, The Glasspack roll; while Small Stone Records meticulously aims for our financial bankruptcy by pelting us with wave after wave of immaculate releases!

Indeed, the parallel trajectories of the aforementioned bands run aplenty. Apart from the obvious similarities, such as being on the same label and simultaneously releasing their last couple of efforts, both bands on their latest offerings use the same studios (Rustbelt Studios) to the same drooling effect, while enriching once more their visual concept via the skillful hands of Mike Saputo (cover artwork). Moreover, they both crew Phil Durr in (him of Big Chief fame) for some guest appearance and both cover 70's classics to great effect (herein "Gimme Shelter" is given the honor). Nevertheless and most importantly, their personality remains distinct and idiosyncratic. Finally, both bands graced us with their best record so far. Read more.

"Bridgeburner" kicks off proceedings, where "Powderkeg" trailed off. And that is in a blast! Three tunes in and some sick grooves blend irrevocably in with your receptors, leaving only the hose of the neck titling to the nauseated fury. This is the sweetness of decadence. The rest of the body tries to catch up but the brain falters. Imagine high-pitched solos flirting with low-end bass. Imagine Marcus DurantĂs vocals (Zen Guerrilla) in a bad sneering mood leaving the soul behind, while adding the grit. Imagine southern boogie gone wrong. Very wrong. And then comes "Hairsoup" to calm the storm in all its acid psychedelic flare with a main riff that is so unapologetically doom. "Lil Birdy" picks up the pace as "Mrs Satan" did on the previous album and the self-titled tune is a beast of a rock ŠnĂ roll monster gone totally bonkers just before reaching, to much amazement and applause, Subarachnoid head Space levels (just check the bassline 3' onwards). Would have also mentioned that on the last tune some guy by the name of Ed Mundell does the lead guitar licks closing the album in instrumental glory. On second thoughts, nahÓ I donĂt think anyone would even care less.

Rate: 12/13


Francoise Massacre
June, 2004
www.monolith.gr

DAREDEVIL MAGAZINE (Germany)

Louisville's best are back and they're ready to kick some serious ass. "Bridgeburner" compared to "American Exhaust" and "Powderkeg" is way more heavy and fuzzy. You can hear the experience of constantly touring and being on the road. "Bridgeburner" brings over the dust, the life on the street... it's an album which has so much energy and you can hear that Dirty and his men have finally found their sound... ok... they were good before, but now they're just better. "Bridgeburner" is a great album which spreads heaviness with a lot of retro feelings without loosin' any power or quality. If you like dirty Rock this one is for you... imagine Nebula would play straight in your face Rock'n' Roll. A damn cool release.

RB
April, 2004

THE BIG TAKEOVER

Three albums into their still-nascent career, Louisville, KYĂs The Glasspack haven't gotten any prettier. Guitars are drenched in gobs of thick-'n'-heavy goo. The rhythm section has reached a new low in an ongoing game of limbo. And commander "Dirty" Dave Johnson sounds like heĂs burned out his vocal into tethers. Despite all that, The pack has become quite proficient along the way; this tray of 11 new recordings took a mere 36 hours to record. It also features the likes of Monster Magnet's Ed Mundell and Bobby Pantella and Big Chief's Phil Durr-acts The pack certainly aspires to emulate. A heavy, swaggering record from top to bottom, but one that proves The Pack always keep a couple surprises in store: a blistering, psych-oriented reading of The Rolling Stones' "Gimme Shelter" and some kazoo pyrotechinics on the title track.

Kurt Orzeck
July 2004
www.bigtakeover.com

BULLY MAGAZINE

All I can say is "Goddamn!" I have to admit I've never been a huge fan of The Glasspack, as I always felt their past albums just were lacking the necessary spark. But Bridgeburner is a huge improvement for these guys in terms of quality songs and great riffs.

From the opening note of "Twenty-five Cents" you become hooked on this disc. The guitars are much stronger in the overall mix & ;dominating the entire album& ;and the rhythm section lays down a pounding rhythm. In fact one can barely hear vocalist/guitarist "Dirty" Dave singing, sounding almost as if he was recorded over a high school intercom. But on "Barn Party" and "Oil Pan" this all works as a cohesive whole, creating a blistering style that the band was lacking on their previous efforts. Part of this may be due to the
fact that the entire disc was banged out in one 36-hour binge, producing a live feel that plays to the band's strengths. It is their raw-edged sound and belligerent swagger that reels you in.

Also helping Bridgeburner to surpass the Glasspack's previous efforts is the focus on all-out rock. From the rugged version of the Rolling Stone's "Gimme Shelter" to the title track they tear through the 11 tracks on here as if they're not even trying (and still make it work), thus producing an unforced, genuine feel that you can dig instantly. Even when they slow it down a bit on "Hairsoup," there is still that loose, belligerent swagger that never leaves their sound. I have to say The Glasspack also deserves points for mixing things up as well. The aforementioned Rolling Stones cover, the quirky "Lil' Birdie" and "Peepshow" are all fine examples of how these guys can still experiment with their sound without killing the overall album flow.
Bridgeburner is a tremendous leap forward for the Louisville quartet. Whatever the cause; more whiskey, weed, or just pure benefits of touring their asses; it paid off.

- Ken Wohlrob
June 2004

MONOLITH (UK)

I can discern an evil pattern forging its menacing wings in heavy rock music. When Halfway To Gone strike, The Glasspack kick; when the former flame, the latter torch. When H.T.G. rock, The Glasspack roll; while Small Stone Records meticulously aims for our financial bankruptcy by pelting us with wave after wave of immaculate releases! Indeed, the parallel trajectories of the aforementioned bands run aplenty. Apart from the obvious similarities, such as being on the same label and simultaneously releasing their last couple of efforts, both bands on their latest offerings use the same studios (Rustbelt studios) to the same drooling effect, while enriching once more their visual concept via the skillful hands of Mike Saputo (cover artwork). Moreover, they both crew Phil Durr in (him of Big Chief fame) for some guest appearance and both cover 70's classics to great effect (herein "Gimme Shelter" is given the honor). Nevertheless and most importantly, their personality remains distinct and idiosyncratic. Finally, both bands graced us with their best record so far. Read more. "Bridgeburner" kicks off proceedings, where "Powderkeg" trailed off. And that is in a blast! Three tunes in and some sick grooves blend irrevocably in with your receptors, leaving only the hose of the neck titling to the nauseated fury. This is the sweetness of decadence. The rest of the body tries to catch up but the brain falters. Imagine high-pitched solos flirting with low-end bass. Imagine Marcus DurantĂs vocals (Zen Guerrilla) in a bad sneering mood leaving the soul behind, while adding the grit. Imagine southern boogie gone wrong. Very wrong. And then comes "Hairsoup" to calm the storm in all its acid psychedelic flare with a main riff that is so unapologetically doom. "Lil Birdy" picks up the pace as "Mrs Satan" did on the previous album and the self-titled tune is a beast of a rock ŠnĂ roll monster gone totally bonkers just before reaching, to much amazement and applause, Subarachnoid head Space levels (just check the bassline 3' onwards). Would have also mentioned that on the last tune some guy by the name of Ed Mundell does the lead guitar licks closing the album in instrumental glory. On second thoughts, nahÓ I donĂt think anyone would even care less.

Rating: 12 of 13

Alexander Simopoulos
May 2004

METRO TIMES

As the bandĂs bio says, LouisvilleĂs least favorite sons are back. And this ainĂt yer mamaĂs brand of Louisville rock ĂnĂ roll, not the kind that spawned math-rock goobers Slint some 15 years ago, or, more recently, psychedelic twangbearers My Morning Jacket. As hosted by the Motor CityĂs hugely underrated Small Stone label, this is lewd ĂnĂ crude, hi-octane drill-press rawk aimed at discriminating fans of such stoner skree as Fu Manchu, Nebula, Clutch and Monster Magnet. (The latterĂs Ed Mundell in fact, turns up here, along with Big ChiefĂs Phil Durr and Small Stone head Scott Hamilton.)

The album kicks off with ˘Twenty-five Cents,÷ an ur-riffage thudder of medieval proportions, which is quickly followed by bass-heavy thrasher ˘Barn Party÷ and the Southern Rock-inclined ˘Oil Pan.÷ The gears duly primed, the Ăpack then shifts into overdrive mode. A throbbing, malevolent reading of ˘Gimme Shelter÷ out-death-trips the old Sisters Of Mercy cover (for that matter, it out-thuds the Grand Funk version too), with vocalist ˘Dirty÷ Dave Johnson ¨ whose shredded-larynx, distorto-vox style is a Glasspack signature ¨ sending psychic shout-outs to every ready-to-rumble, cue-stick-wielding HellĂs Angel within earshot. Another high point is ˘Hairsoup,÷ a wah-wah flecked space jam (instrumental, save some wordless shrieks) straight outta Monster Magnet territory. And ˘Peepshow,÷ also an instro, is a storm-troopinĂ, blues-based riffer featuring some ferocious Nuge-style licks from guest ax-man Mundell.

Bottom line: When you climb onboard the Glasspack, expect a hang-on-tight, white-knuckler of a ride. And thereĂll be no pit stops to take a whiz, so handle your business beforehand.

Fred Mills
May 2004

LOLLIPOP MAGAZINE

There was a time a few years back, around the time of the band's debut EP, when you could call the Glasspack a punk band and be reasonably assured that you were making an accurate statement. 3 full-lengths and, one gets the feeling, several tons of illicit substances later, thereĂs no way such a term could be used unless the word "gutter" is intractably affixed to the front. This shit is knee-deep in bell bottoms, psychedelic drugs, and distortion pedals, which is probably why theyĂve been embraced by the stoner rock folks. It's also why IĂve been rattling the windows with this CD ever since it turned up in the mailbox a few days back.

I suppose the MC5 is the most apt comparison I can make, but even that doesn't entirely satisfy; if you can imagine the 5 with their minds worn to a nub by paint fume inhalation and minus the ridiculous free-jazz shit, that's as close to the Pack as I'm gonna be able to get ya. In any case, Bridgeburner definitely picks up where the band's previous Small Stone release Powderkeg left off (before it wandered off into a field and passed out, that is), the chaotic blur of the band's attack doing its best to keep its desperate clutch on the songs while threatening at any moment to skid off the road and into a ditch. The recording's a bit tighter and more cohesive this time around, which can be both good and bad, especially for a band that so obviously thrives on chaos. Nobody's EVER gonna mistake this for a polished recording, but there are less flying elbows and broken teeth this time around. Maybe it's the work of the engineer or maybe it's just the sound of a tighter band. In any case, the ferocity has not relinquished one bit, the tumult of the band and the wholly distorted vocals, which sound as if they're being sung through a ball of fuzz on the end of a phonograph needle, threatening at points to actually induce motion sickness. The overall effect of listening to Bridgeburner is something like walking into a sped-up film of a drunk driver smashing a speeding car into a brick wall, bits of glass and smoldering metal splattered with blood and gore flying past you even though everything is moving so fast you can't tell what's what.


Brian Varney
May 2004

ROCK REPORT (BENELUX)

5 out of 6 stars

The Glasspack have already given us the one and only soundtrack for your acid and booze parties with "American Exhaust" and "Powderkeg" but what theyĂve succeeded in doing on the new record "Bridgeburner" goes far beyond comprehension. They laid down no less than 11 tracks of pure madness and energy within a mere 39 minutes (Def Leppard eat your heart out!)!! The best way to describe their sonic assault is riff pumping, swamp drenched, freaked out music for MC5 and Stooges people. As far as I'm concerned The Glasspack are what it's all about in the underground rock business these days. No remorse, no compromises and not for sissy assed radio lovers. Rock for the new millennium comes straight out of Louisville, Kentucky: a brutal attack on contemporary music values. Listen to "Oil Pan" and "Bridgeburner" and tell me this isn't exactly what the doctor ordered to feed that all important libido! Finally a man can stink when he gets horny!


KVK
May 1st, 2004
www.rockreport.be

HIGH BIAS

Art in music is a damn good thing, but sometimes you just gotta rock. And if you wanna do that, you'll find no better soundtrack to your head/finger/groupie-bangin' dreams than Bridgeburner, the new album from Kentucky's Glasspack. Dirty Dave rocks the ear wax out of the garage grunge riffs, the heavy groovin' melodies, his poor Telecaster, "Sympathy for the Devil" and pretty much anybody who gets too close. Who will thank him for it later, believe me..


Michael Toland
- April 24th, 2004
www.highbias.com

HELLRIDE MUSIC

Louisville's most notorious power trio, The Glasspack, have always been about a bongload of sheer insanity and attitude combined with a genuine dedication to their unique brand of dirty-ass rock. Bridgeburner, the best album in their career so far, is a most effective blend of the two, a shining example of what the group does best and a throbbing middle finger to music industry squares. To hell with 'em!

The Glasspack is as sweaty and raw as they come, a garage band overdosing on speed, whiskey, and mushrooms, burning their fingertips off like tonight's their last night on earth. There's no highfalutin' intentions here, just an allegiance to the Stooges, MC5, Allman Bros., and classic fuzzed-out rock in general. The vocals are all stoned Iggy desperation and the guitars n' drums combine to create music for the biker party of your dreams. 'Twenty-Five Cents' is a 'Funhouse'-era chug with odd-sounding feedback notes, their cover of the Stones' 'Gimme Shelter' is a uniquely Glasspack reinterpretation of the classic that's full of passion and head-tossing sweat, and 'Peepshow' is an instro with guitar to die for, courtesy of Monster Magnet's Ed Mundell. In fact, MM's Bobby Pantella also appears on Bridgeburner, as does Phil Durr from the legendary Big Chief.

There's no pretensions to doom, mathiness, or prog here. The Glasspack are too busy clamping down on your music gland with a head full of drugs and a badass 'tude to worry about feeling intellectual or miserable. So put on your headphones, get lit, and enjoy this seedy soundtrack to your next bad trip. It's the ginchiest, baby!s.

Kevin McHugh
April 2004
www.hellridemusic.com

METAL-RULES.COM

Rating: 3.5/5

YĂknow, I realize that it takes a lot of work for a band to write music, record an album, go out on tour, relax for a bout five seconds, and then do it all over again. The fact that most bands go through the whole process in about two years is quite astounding if you think about it. Still, isnĂt it always a kickass surprise when a band manages to get an album out almost every year? This brings me to The Glasspack. The band has only been in existence since 1999, but theyĂve somehow managed to put out three full length albums since 2001. In between those releases, the band has also managed to put more than 15,000 miles under their collective belts on various tours around North America. Talk about dedication to your art. A few more bands like this and people would quickly run out of money buying albums and going to shows every night. Anyway, just who are The Glasspack and what the hell is a BRIDGEBURNER?

Well, IĂll spare you the details on who the band is; suffice it to say that they all rock. Hard. With a vicious rock assault reminiscent of * insert various hard rocking 70s bands here *, The Glasspack rock and party like itĂs a 1975 coke party with go-go girls dancing on pedestals and people doing lines off of one anotherĂs bodies. At least thatĂs the feeling that I get when I listen to ˘Gimme Shelter÷. Seriously, the song rocks man. Fire it up and see if you donĂt believe me.

The band is undoubtedly led by ˘Dirty÷ Dave and his battered and torturous vocals. His caw is so unpolished that you just have to love it. His guitar wails away, seemingly uncaring of the song (it takes talent to sound like this without sounding simply messy) while all the while the band behind him rock the rhythms and grooves as hard as possible, perhaps attempting to play powerfully enough to open some kind of warp back into the 70s.

Indeed, everything whips and howls along just fine until the band get it in their heads to start firing instrumental after instrumental at us. Of the 11 songs on here, only 5 have vocals, and 4 of those lead off the album. ItĂs not to say that the instrumentals are crappy, Šcause they are actually pretty good, but a little more mixing and matching would have gone down a lot better. Pacing man, itĂs all about pacing. All that aside, BRIDGEBURNER still pounds harder than 90% of the other crap that is passed off as rock music these days. Go buy it and reveal in its amped up goodness.


Waspman
April, 2004
www.metal-rules.com/

AMG

Few bands get by on such devil-may-care magnetism as retro hard rockers The Glasspack. Back for their third L.P. (and second for Small Stone), the Louisville lunatics' almost casual ability to rock out can actually leave one questioning their commitment to the gig. And the fact that all of Bridgeburner was cut in a 36-hour haul might only serve to feed the flames of this assumption. But, it only takes a few listens to the searing grooves of "Twenty-Five Cents" or "Oil Pan" to realize that just how much passion is involved in their make-up. (Although Špassion' may be a somewhat dubious word to apply to a giddy redneck anthem like "Barn Party"!) Spun together into The Glasspack's sharp-toothed musical grinder, roaring
guitar licks, smoking rhythms and the whiskey soaked rasp of possessed frontman "Dirty" Dave Johnson spell just one thing: rock & roll, baby! And were it not for an over-abundance of instrumentals -- ranging from manic rockers like "Hydroplane" and "Getting Shitty," to the enigmatically named spacey jam that separates them called "Hairsoup" -- Bridgeburner would be a hard outing to fault. Laid-back closer "Peepshow," although wordless as well, comes garnished with a reliably dazzling solo courtesy of Monster Magnet/Atomic Bitchwax six-string star Ed Mundell, but The
Glasspack do sound a little too careless and sloppy on their rendition of the Stones' "Gimme Shelter." In short, although Bridgeburner is definitely a few cards short of a full deck, 70's hard rock revivalists looking for blue-collar honesty and massive Šcojones' are sure to get more than their money's worth.



Ed Rivadavia
April 13th, 2004
www.allmusic.com

LOUISVILLE MUSIC NEWS

Having interviewed "Dirty" Dave Johnson and listened repeatedly to his records, my impression is that he's a musician version of a method actor. There is a script, but he lives the part and is both cursed and blessed. The molten lava rock of both American Exhaust and Powderkeg is red hot and merciless; neither album is for fans of mainstream entertainment, but fans of 16-ton rock should own both. MTV2 cowered away from The Glasspack's "Mrs. Satan" video. So, what did Johnson and his co-workers do? They stuck to their guns by recording another album of heavy artillery. Bridgeburner shatters windows, makes the walls tremble and doesn't look back.

Though Johnson's familiar growl is abundant, this CD's emphasis is on the music. After listening to it several times in its entirety, the only lyrics I deciphered can't be printed here. Hence, my question is, how do these guys play music like this without repeating themselves? One answer is that they're on a boat with Ozric Tentacles; it's easy to say that if you have one album, you have them all, but that is misleading. The Glasspack has a "sound" but each new album is different from the previous. What separates Bridgeburner from the other Glasspack albums? Well, aside from the vocals being harder to understand, the music sounds like a step forward. Listen to this CD and you won't hear a rerun of other Glasspack CDs. "Gimme Shelter" marks the first appearance of a cover song on a Glasspack album. Not only that, but "Hairsoup" might be one of the sexiest slow-burning hard rock song since Ted Nugent's "Stranglehold."

If you dig The Glasspack's previous work, Bridgeburner is a must-have. If you don't like one or both of their back records, it can't hurt to give this one a shot or if you haven't even heard of The Glasspack until now, try starting with this one and working backwards.



David Lilly
April 1st, 2004
Louisville Music News

SLEAZEGRINDER

666 gallons of chicken grease, Astroglide, and motor-oil await you on this rather, uh, slick hellstomp of Southern-fried superboogie. SĂfunny, these Kentucky boys went all the way up to Michigan to record this Šun (I know, Šcuz I ran into Glasspack honcho Gentleman Dirty Dave in a seedy Dee-troit dive during the Cock nĂ Roll two-city tour), and goddamn if Murder City didnĂt rub off on them, cuz they seem to have traded in the rampant Sabbath-isms of their last slab for even more rampant Stooge-isms this time around. DirtyĂs geetah is on fire here, an acidic, cosmic death ray spreadinĂ rays of red sunshine all over the place, and his backline is stomping and fussing like surly rhinos behind him. For maximum density, check out earth-shaking closer ˘Peepshow÷, a Tall Boy-soaked wall of space metal riffs that sounds like every one of NugeĂs Amboy Dukes solos crammed into one 4 minute pile of angry guitars, and for a clear indication of how willing Glasspack are to be the last men standing in the rock nĂ roll war, check out the biker-party fuzz-riot of ˘Seein' Shitty÷. Oh, and as an added bonus, also on deck is the deepest, darkest cover of ˘Gimmie Shelter÷ since the Sisters of
Mercy. All wrapped up in a beautiful death-trip sleeve by Mike Saputo, ˘Bridgeburner÷ is state of the art superheavy, guaranteed to lubricate yr engine and blow a door or two right off.



Ken
March 18th, 2004
www.sleazegrinder.com

DAREDEVIL RECORDS (Germany)

Along with their label mates HALFWAY TO GONE, this is also their third longplayer, and these guys also gained a heavy, nasty edge. TWENTY-FIVE CENTS rolls it off hard and dirty, and oh boy what happened to the vocals of "Dirty" Dave Johnson, they sound harder, dirtier, nastier and even more wicked like on the 2002 released POWDERKEG (as it wasn"t dirty enough already). And for me this is more than just a pleasant surprise. BARN PARTY puts a heap of PUNK on the deck, OIL PAN shows some southern hostility, GIMME SHELTER is a great dirt version of the ROLLING STONES classic along with the sick vocals of Dave, HYDROPLANE pulls one along on the hair through rusted nails. This just goes on and on, theres not much space to breath for some air. This bastard really hits my nerve, the rumbling and scratchy prodcution increases the effect even more. Somehow they remind me of a total over the top version of the great MUDHONEY. Just imagine them on rabies. By the way instrumental tracks on the album do not bore, even they got a fierce touch to them. Only BRIDGEBURNER asks some tolerance from the listener. If you like it dirty, well get even dirtier with THE PACK.

GENRE: DIRTY ROCK'N'ROLL
MUSIC: 8
SOUND: 7
INFO: 11 Songs


Thomas Schubert
March, 2004
www.dardevilrecords.de

REBEL EXTRAVAGANZA

On this, their 3rd full-length, it's obvious The Glasspack have something to prove. I've often said it's the 3rd album that really defines a band's sound. The first album most times is made up of older songs, while the second is usually a rush job, so it falls to the third to show you what the band is truly capable of. Oftentimes, this also finds the band getting comfortable in their sound and with the studio recording process. And all that's well and good.

But this ain't fuckin' philosophy, and The Glasspack ain't the fuckin' teacher's pet. The Glasspack exists for one reason, and that reason is rock. Without dirty, seat-of-the-pants rock, there would be no reason for The Glasspack to even bother. If you're looking for crystal meth-clear production and 42-track recording studios, this band ain't for you. If you spend your weeknights retooling your '78 Chevy Nova and drinking Pabst to Grand Funk and On The Rocks by Aerosmith on vinyl, then what the fuck are you waiting for? The band is The Glasspack, the album is Bridgeburner, and I'm thinking any bridge left in their flaming wake damn well deserved it.

'Hairsoup' almost puts you in the mind of Goatsnake's 'What Love Remains', with it's plodding rhythm pulling you to a hazy almost-sleep state until the proto-Sabbath riff lays you out cold, while 'Gettin' Shitty' and 'Lil' Birdie' are rave-ups that'll remind you that this isn't doom, it's not punk, it's not metal. It's rock'n'roll, and The Glasspack ain't asking questions later, if you get my drift. Oh, and with a version of 'Gimme Shelter' that could only have given birth to one mother of a hangover, there's only one thing left to say...

Lord Randall
March, 2004
www.rebelx.org

STONERROCKCHICK.COM

After blazing new paths in fuzzdom with ˘American Exhaust÷ and ˘Powderkeg÷, the ŠPack is back with their 3rd full length "Bridgeburner"; 11 tracks of steaming Kentucky swamp fuzz kicked into overdrive with the help of their pals in Big Chief, Players Club and Monster Magnet.

After numerous listens, "Bridgeburner" has all the earmarks of classic Glasspack ű heavy duty Dirty Dave fuzz guitar, exploding transistor radio vocal effects and an energetic group of rhythmic soldiers that recklessly follow his lead.

"Twenty Five Cents" squeals out of the gate, taking on that 'Magnet vibe mostly due to the down-tuned quick riffing and stop start, offbeat drumming of The Cap'n who comes close to peaking on the mile a minute "Barn Party". With tracks like these, it is no wonder most Glasspack songs never venture past the 3-4 minute mark. ˘Hydroplane÷ is a solid 2:19 of pure instrumental Glasspack, that is forever picking up speed; even during the short "Reprise" version later on
in the disc.

What really strikes me about ˘Bridgeburner÷ is what the extra players bring to the table. "Hairsoup" works on that dirgy, trippy Jersey-jam feel reminiscent of The Scene Killer Project, while the extra whooshy, feedback play on the title track spurs on some wicked TABÓ25 flashbacks. As for the kazoo? Well, no one couldĂve seen that one coming. Leave it to Dave to make a fucking kazoo sound cool.

The crowning jewel on "Bridgeburner" goes to the closing track "Peepshow", which picks up where "Mrs. Satan" left off, and is made all the more colourful with the brilliant, emotive guitar prowess of head Magnet and 'Wax man Ed Mundell.

"Bridgeburner" was worth the wait. The Glasspack has never sounded so good. The official release date on this mother is April 27th ű but between us, you can get it NOW over at the Small Stone website for a measly $12. Preview the "Oil Pan" Mp3 over at the Glasspack website..

Nick Muc
March, 2004
www.stonerrockchick.com

STONERROCK.COM

The Glasspack are one band that never disappoints me, and the 'Bridgeburner' is the best album they have done- hands down. Right from the first track (Twenty-Five Cents) you know that you are going to love it.

For those that don't know about Louisville's Glasspack, their sound is a blend of raw garage and swamp blues, soul and sweat. This three piece has churned out nothing but great material in the past so it was no surprise that I would like the 'Bridgeburner' CD as much as I do. The songs are raw and captured just as they (the Glasspack) come across live, which makes total sense; since 'BrideburnerĂ was recorded from start to finish within a 36 hour period. The songs are all obviously rehearsed to death before they showed up to record, but something tells me these are all first takes, or ones close to.

Dirty's guitar sound has always been fuzzy and aggressive and sometimes out of control on purpose, his little blues leads thrown in from time to time are definitely an serious part of the 'Dirty Sound'. Add some mean vox wah and blood thinning vocals and you are getting close. Dirty's microphone effect is always nice, overdriven and great. His leads this time are way more laid back then the ones on previous releases. Great attack and feedback sometimes reminiscent of Hendrix/rock and roll 60's. Especially tasty Rolling Stones cover paying homage to some of the oldest rock and rollers on the planet.

The rest of the band 'ain't no slouches neither!' You got Bucky, the madman axe handler on deck and also the slamming precision of The Cap'n behind the kit. These guys are an unstoppable rock and roll machine without a doubt. Check out the Bridgeburner if you dig everything from MC5 to Hendrix and Hooker 'N' Heat. Its soul laced psychedelic tinged heavy rock and roll madness, and I love it's.

Rob Wrong
February 2004
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